FYI: The new VLF bands

Image result for 630 meter ham band

There was a lot of talk at our last meeting about the two new VLF ham band and what it will take to get on the air.  I found this while surfing and it answers a lot of questions.   You will need Microsoft Powerpoint or at least a viewer {link below} to see the presentation.

From the N6LF blog: SeaPac 2014 630m talk
On Saturday June 7th I gave a talk at SeaPac 2014.  You can download the PowerPoint presentation here: Download Sea-Pac 2014 Presentation .  I should add that the Flex Radio 1500 and 6000 series SDR’s can transmit on 630m.  I spoke with the K3 folks and while the K3 will not operate directly that low in frequency they have modified the software to be compatible with transverters.

For true LF operation read this:

To view the powerpoint presentation you will need this viewer from Microsoft

Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 comparison

No Nonsense Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 Comparison
Rich, K0PIR

It’s time I did the Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 comparison. I’m not going to list my personal likes and dislikes. I think many of the early reviews of the Icom 7610 were premature in their criticism. I’ve had my IC-7610 for over a month (December 2017) and have used it daily, including in the last ARRL RTTY Roundup. I’m very pleased with the ergonomics. The Icom 7300 is an entry level radio, while the Icom 7610 is designed for DX’ing and contesting. Let’s look at the basic physical differences and a no-nonsense comparison. So, if you are considering the Icom 7610, hopefully this will help.

Read the full article here

Byrd Antarctic Expedition Morse Key

ARRL has received from Lynn Burlingame, N7CFO, the donation of a Kilbourne & Clark Morse key that the late Howard Mason (1ID, 7BU, and K7QB) used to let the world know that Rear Admiral Richard Byrd and his crew had overflown the South Pole for the first time during Byrd’s 1928 – 1930 Antarctic expedition. Mason and his 80 colleagues were awarded Congressional Gold Medals for their efforts in establishing the Antarctic outpost “Little America,” the first of a series of bases bearing that name.

Read the full article at the ARRL website

Geostationary “Phase 4” Satellite

Es’HailSat-2 with two geostationary “Phase 4” amateur radio transponders The Qatar Amateur Radio Society has presented to Es’ Hailsat, the Qatar Satellite Company, a concept and specification for an amateur radio payload on the new geostationary communication satellite Es’HailSat- 2 presented. Based on this specification, Es’ Hailsat announced that amateur radio transponders will be on board.

Es’HailSat-2 will have a 250 kHz wide linear transponder for conventional analogue operation as well as an 8 MHz transponder for experimental digital modulation modes and DVB-ATV.

The exact uplink and downlink frequencies are not yet finalized. However, it is clear that the uplink in the range 2.400 to 2.450 GHz and the downlink in the range 10.450 to 10.500 GHz will be within the respective amateur radio assignments. The antennas of both transponders will have large aperture angles, so that the maximum possible area, ie about one third of the earth’s surface, is covered.

Exact technical parameters will be set within the next few months. It is expected that only a relatively simple station equipment is required for operation over this satellite.

This groundbreaking project will trigger a phase of new, exciting amateur radio activity. The technical expertise is provided by a team of radio amateurs led by Peter Gülzow (DB2OS, AMSAT-DL President).

For More Information Click Here for the AMSAT-DL website

“Sorry guys it will be station over Europe” “
“Also sorry for the English it was translated from German”

Skywarn Class for Allegheny County.

SKYWARN® is a National Weather Service (NWS) program developed in the 1960s that consists of trained weather spotters who provide reports of severe and hazardous weather to help meteorologists make life-saving warning decisions. Spotters are concerned citizens, amateur radio operators, truck drivers, mariners, airplane pilots, emergency management personnel, and public safety officials who volunteer their time and energy to report on hazardous weather impacting their community.

Here is a link to the NWS page to register for the Skywarn class for Allegheny County.
Lloyd KA3MSE

Receiver Comparisons with the IC-7610 with Rob Sherwood

If you missed the broadcast of this show it can be heard here:
Listen to “Episode 99 – Receiver Comparisons including the IC-7610 with Rob Sherwood, NC0B” on Spreaker.

Thursday night at 9 pm Eastern on the next episode of Ham Talk Live!, Rob Sherwood, NC0B of Sherwood Engineering will be here to talk about his latest analysis of receivers, including the new Icom 7610. We will talk about comparing the 7610 to the 7300 and other receivers, and answer the questions that are sent in advance. (Questions were taken in advance on social media this week due to scheduling conflicts for live Q&A).

Tune into Ham Talk Live! Thursday night at 9 pm Eastern time by going to When the audio player indicates LIVE, just hit the play button! If you miss the show live, you can listen on demand 24/7/365.25 also at; or a podcast version is on nearly all podcast sites a few minutes after the live show is over. Some sites include Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, SoundCloud, and iHeart Podcasts; and it’s also available on YouTube.

Be sure to CALL in with your questions and comments by calling 812-NET-HAM-1 live during the show, or by Skype. Our username is hamtalklive. You can also tweet your questions before or during the show to Ham Talk Live

W3KWH FT-8 Log

                         W3KWH FT-8 Log

Wondering how popular the new digital mode FT-8 mode is getting?  We downloaded the logbook from the WSJTX program on just the Kenwood TS-590 rig.  This one radio had over 952 QSO with other FT-8 users from around the world. I have broken down the log by the different bands and have sorted the list by call sign.  I have also included the complete logbook in Excel format if you want to dig it down farther.

6m                        88
10m                        9
15m                    154
17m                        2
20m                    172
40m                    351
80m                        2
160m                  157
Unknown Band    26

Total QSO           952

PDF of the logbook sorted by call sign

Complete raw logbook in Excel


AO-91 open for amateur use!

From AMSAT.ORG website

At 06:50 UTC on November 23, 2017, AMSAT Engineering officially commissioned AO-91 (RadFxSat/Fox-1B). AMSAT Vice-President Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, turned over operation to AMSAT Operations in a QSO on the AO-91 transponder with Mark Hammond, N8MH, of the AMSAT Operations team during the pass over the Eastern United States.

N8MH responded and declared AO-91 open for amateur use!

AO-91 was built as a partnership with Vanderbilt University ISDE and hosts four payloads for the study of radiation effects on commercial off the shelf components. The satellite was launched on November 18, 2017 as part of the ELaNa XIV mission, secondary payloads aboard the Delta II rocket that carried the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1) satellite to orbit. AO-91 also features the Fox-1 style FM U/v repeater with an uplink on 435.250 MHz (67.0 Hz CTCSS) and a downlink on 145.960 MHz. Satellite and experiment telemetry are downlinked via the “DUV” subaudible telemetry stream and can be decoded with the FoxTelem software.