Hurricane Watch Net

The Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) has announced tentative plans to activate on 14.325 MHz on Wednesday, September 18, at 1800 UTC. The net will switch to 7.268 MHz at 2100 UTC on Wednesday.

“Today has been a busy day in the tropics,” Net Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV, said. “Since 1500 UTC, four new systems have been identified — two already named. At present, the storm we are most interested in is Hurricane Humberto.” The Category 2 Atlantic storm is forecast to affect Bermuda late Wednesday evening or early Thursday morning, with the eye forecast to remain north of Bermuda. Graves said any deviation to the right of the forecast track could bring the eye closer or even onshore.

The Hurricane Watch Net will remain active on 14.325 MHz for as long as propagation allows, switching to 7.268.00 MHz at 2100 UTC and remaining in operation until Humberto is no longer a threat.

“This activation plan is subject to change,” Graves advised. “As with any net activation, we request observed ground-truth data from those in the affected area (wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, barometric pressure — if available, rainfall, damage, and storm surge). Measured weather data is always appreciated but we do accept estimates.”

Graves said other Atlantic storms include Tropical Depression (TD) 10 and Tropical Storm (TS) Imelda, while on the Eastern Pacific side are TD 14-E, TS Lorena, and the Category 1 Hurricane Kiko.

Celebrating 100 years of WWV

WW0WWV – 1919-2019

We’re glad you’ve joined us to help celebrate the World’s oldest continually operating radio station, WWV, as it turns 100 on October 1, 2019 –  less than 5 months!

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Northern Colorado Amateur Radio Club (NCARC) have reached an agreement and are working together to organize the event.

NIST will focus on the plans for Tuesday, October 1, 2019, when they will host a recognition ceremony and an open house at the radio station north of Fort Collins.

NCARC will operate a special event amateur radio station, call sign WW0WWV, on the WWV property starting September 28 and going 24-hours a day through October 2, 2019.  The goal is to make as many U.S. and world-wide contacts during the 120-hour period as possible, using multiple bands and multiple modes on at least 4 simultaneous transmitters.  The effort will require hundreds of volunteer operators.

For more info on the special event:
http://wwv100.com/

For more info on WWV @ 100 years:
https://www.nist.gov/news-events/events/2019/10/nist-radio-station-wwv-100-year-anniversary

SUNDAY NIGHT DIGITAL NET

Try out the area wide digital net on the Keystone-West network. Local users can access it on the W3KWH 444.450 repeater or any of Pittsburgh area C4FM repeaters, we are going to have a area wide digital net on the system fusion KEYSTONE-WEST room.  Room number #60328.  With the Yaesu Fusion getting more popular we thought it would help out operators just getting into the Fusion System somewhere to go to for information.  If your club has an Yaesu System Fusion repeater talk the leadership into connecting it to room #60328 for at least one hour a week.

 

VE Testing This Sept 18th

Chris Grimm K3PQ is now our VE Testing examiner contact person.  People interesting in becoming an amature radio operator or planning to upgrade their license should get in touch with Chris at the email below.   The testing sessions will be held on the Wednesday after the Steel City Business meeting at 7:00 PM – Sept 18th at the Steel City club house. Preregistration is highly recommend and will have priority, but walk-in’s will be allowed if space is available.

Chris K3PQ can be reached at INFO {at} W3KWH {dit} COM
Steel City VE Testing Website: http://w3kwh.com/ve-testing/

Locating RF Interference at HF

A proven and practical approach to dealing with RFI from grow lights and more.

By Tom Thompson, WØIVJ
Radio frequency interference (RFI) increased dramatically in my neighborhood
recently. Locating the sources was not easy, due in part to the distances involved.
The typical range for a consumer device that meets the applicable FCC Part 15 or
18 emissions limits is usually no more than a few hundred feet. Some of the
sources in my area, however, were more than a half-mile away. The usual “sniff”
methods weren’t practical, and without an initial heading, the sources were difficult
to find. Furthermore, they were primarily HF sources. I needed a radio direction
finder, but an HF handheld Yagi was not an option!

Continue reading on the ARRL website

 

AMSAT and ARISS Designing for Lunar Gateway

Details are still being fleshed out, but AMSAT and ARISS are working on the design of an Amateur Radio system for NASA’s Lunar Gateway. As NASA explains, the Gateway “will be a small spaceship in orbit around the moon that will provide access to more of the lunar surface than ever before with living quarters for astronauts, a lab for science and research, ports for visiting spacecraft, and more.” For NASA, the Lunar Gateway is “a spaceport for human and robotic exploration to the moon and beyond.” For radio amateurs, the Lunar Gateway will represent the next step in moving ham radio out of low-Earth orbit and into deep space. Under the current timeline, initial sections of the Gateway are scheduled to launch in 2022, with the Gateway in lunar orbit by 2026.

“To make this happen, we are leveraging the work and expertise of the worldwide AMSAT organizations and the international ARISS community in this endeavor,” ARISS-International Chair and AMSAT Vice President for Human Spaceflight Programs Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said. “We have an international team working on this and are meeting twice a month to mature the concept.” The ARISS concept was presented to NASA in May and got positive feedback, and was favorably received a few weeks later at the ARISS-International meeting in Montreal from the Canadian Space Agency’s Gateway Program Manager.

“The Amateur Radio Exploration (AREx) team has done some really good work,” Bauer continued. “The challenge for amateurs will be on the order of a 30 dB signal path loss as compared to LEO. But the link margins on our design seem too close.”

Read the full short here: ARRL.ORG

All antenna projects are now done!

The last antenna is now up and open for contacts

Click Image for full size image

Now all the tower are filled with antenna’s at the steel City club house.  The NA4RR Hex Beam antenna is on top of the far tower.  Contacts have all ready been made with Joe WA3FWA making the first contact with an parks on the air station in Nova Scotia.  This antenna will cover the follow bands: 6, 10, 12, 15, 17, and 20 and buy throwing a switch at the patch panel it will cover the 40m band also.  Members should log into the member only section to see the article for all of Steel City antenna farm.

Here is a nice article describing the NA4RR hex beam

Coax Cable

From the ARRL “So What” podcast
All about the Coax Cable


Regardless of whether you are operating at HF, VHF or UHF, the quality of your feed line is critical to your station. The feed line (also called the transmission line) is the RF power conduit between your radio and your antenna. All the energy you generate travels to the antenna through the feed line. By the same token, all the signals picked up by your antenna must reach your radio through the same feed line.

Read the rest on the ARRL Website

Wikipedia Artical:  Coaxial Cable info

 

World Scout Jamboree — NA1WJ Station

World Scout Jamboree — NA1WJ Station

You can work the World Scout Jamboree station July 22 to August 1.

We will be posting our operating frequencies in real time on Facebook and Twitter. You can also join our email group at https://groups.io/g/na1wj.

See Amateur Radio Live from the Jamboree for detailed information on frequencies.


Steel City Members:  Please keep an eye on this the scout will be looking for some contact and they will need our help

SSB in MHz: 28.390, 24.960, 21.360, 18.140, 14.290, 7.190, 3.940

PSK-31 in MHz: 28.120, 24.920, 21.080, 18.100, 14.070, 10.142, 7.080, 3.580

EchoLink: Conference *JAMBO* (node 832996).
Please plan to connect via *JAMBO* conference for best results.

CW: There will be limited operation on CW as time permits. See Scouting Frequencies.

SATELLITES: We will be active on the FM and SSB satellites.

Wall Street Tries Shortwave Radio

Wall Street Tries Shortwave Radio to Make High-Frequency Trades Across the Atlantic

Editor Note: While this is not an direct amateur related article it is using our technology. Hopefully it doesn’t hurt our small bands.

Read the full article here:  IEEE Spectrum 

Shortwave radio is venerable technology, dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Radio amateurs, often called hams, use it to contact one another around the world with modest equipment. So it’s surprising, really, that high-frequency traders have only lately begun to take advantage of this technique. But that appears to be what is happening.

I say “appears” because there’s only indirect evidence that traders are pursuing this approach. Most comes from Bob Van Valzah, a software engineer and networking specialist who characterizes himself as a “latency buster.” By chance, he stumbled on an odd-looking cell tower in West Chicago, near where he lives, and after much investigation  concluded that the giant antennas sprouting from it were sending signals about goings on at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange to trading centers in Europe.

Who exactly is using this link? If you dig through the FCC’s online license database, you can find that although the official license for the West Chicago tower that Van Valzah investigated was awarded to one company, the “real party of interest” is IMC B.V., a technology-driven trading firm that has invested in McKay Brothers [PDF] and thus is no stranger to the value of low-latency radio links.

Read the full article here:  IEEE Spectrum

Here is another more detail post on what is going on here:
SHORTWAVE TRADING | PART III | FOURTH CHICAGO SITE, EAST COAST