Read the HF Voyager Post First: Click Here

Steel City members Who will make the first contact with the HF-Voyager remote drone ship using FT-8 digital mode.  So start looking for call sign KH6JF/mm on your 20 meter HF 14,074 Mhz feed.  This first Steel City member that makes a QSO with the drone will be honored here on the website. So warm up those transmitters and try reach out a robot ship out in the middle of the Pacific.  Once you make a contact just email Christine N3LRG the information and I will confirm it via the portal below.  You can use your own station or the club station.


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For More Information:

HF-Voyager Portal – Current location and most resent contacts

HF-Voyager Blog – Don’t believe the “Turn off” message

AE5X Blog with interest information – Some background infortmation

Hackaday.com – Original Hackaday article

The HF Voyager Project

UPDATE!  – W3PIE make contact with drone ship!
Who going to make the first contact from Steel City?

Click here for full size image

From the original HACKADAY.COM article:

Amateur radio is an extremely broad church when it comes to the numerous different activities that it covers. Most of the stories featuring radio amateurs that we cover here have involved home-made radios, but that represents a surprisingly small subset of licence holders.

One activity that captivates many operators is grid square collecting. The map is divided into grid squares, can you make contact with all of them? Land-based squares in Europe and North America are easy, those in some more sparsely populated regions a little less so, and some squares out in the ocean are nigh-on impossible. As an attempt to solve this problem, the Jupiter Research Foundation Amateur Radio Club have put an HF transceiver and associated electronics in a WaveGlider autonomous seagoing vehicle. The idea is that it will traverse the ocean, and you can work it, thus getting the contact you require to add those rarest of grid squares to your list.

The transceiver in question is a commercial portable one, an Elecraft KX3, and the brain of the payload is a Raspberry PI. It’s operating the FT8 mode, and will respond to a call on 14074 kHz in an automated fashion (Or it would, were its status page not telling us that it is offline due to power issues). It’s currently somewhere in the Pacific ocean, having been at sea now for a couple of months.

We spotted this through a spirited online discussion as to whether working an automated station is really a proper contact at all, with one amateur commenting that it might be a way for him to keep on going post mortem. But the ethics of the contact aside, it’s an extremely interesting project and one we hope eventually will come back online.

Thanks Sotabeams, via [AE5X].

Clink here for drone Current Location

Bicycle Mobile Hams of America

Thanks for expressing interest in combining bicycling with amateur radio, popularly called “ham radio”. I’m assuming that you are not a ham radio operator and that you’d like to know how to get started in this most useful mode of communication. (If you’re already a ham radio operator, read on. I’m quite sure you’ll agree with what I have to say.)

Check out their website:

Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 comparison

No Nonsense Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 Comparison
Rich, K0PIR

It’s time I did the Icom 7300 vs. Icom 7610 comparison. I’m not going to list my personal likes and dislikes. I think many of the early reviews of the Icom 7610 were premature in their criticism. I’ve had my IC-7610 for over a month (December 2017) and have used it daily, including in the last ARRL RTTY Roundup. I’m very pleased with the ergonomics. The Icom 7300 is an entry level radio, while the Icom 7610 is designed for DX’ing and contesting. Let’s look at the basic physical differences and a no-nonsense comparison. So, if you are considering the Icom 7610, hopefully this will help.

Read the full article here

Yaesu announced a new FT-818

Today Yaesu announced a new FT-817ND replacement is on the way — the FT-818!

The new Yaesu FT-818 incorporates all of the basic and attractive features of the ever-popular FT-817ND while providing upgrades desired by many existing owners.

A few notable improvements include:

  • Increased power output to 6W
  • Improved frequency stability
  • Larger battery capacity

More information and full specs available at:


Introducing Remote 3 – SDR Play

UPDATE: Today the Remote 3 computer was move out to the communication hut.  A separate dipole antenna that was donated by Karl WA3VXJ that was add to the repeater tower which is on antenna “A” input, and for antenna “B” input we have it hooked to the old Diamond repeater antenna.  The remote is now separated from any of the club house antennas. 

Since we replace the computer that was hooked up to the Remote 1 station that free up the old computer. While we were having issues with the ports on that old computer the computer itself had not died yet.  So the IT group decided to keep in functioning until it dies completely.  We have move the SDRPlay to the old computer and rename the computer to Remote 3.  It is using the same Teamviewer ID for the old remote 1 station and the only thing you need to do is click on “Communicate” and make sure “Computer Sounds” is checked.  Like you can see in the below picture.

Trip To DX Engineering

The good WX on Saturday brought out a great turnout at DX Engineering. The new Icom 7610 was one of the main interests at the event and great deals on open box items. Nothing like going to a Ham radio store to spin the dials on all the new equipment. The staff at DX was there to answer questions and help with orders, not many guys and gals leaving with empty hands. Tnx to Tim Duffy K3LR who was also helping and greeting as many folks as he could. Looking forward to the August event which might include a car show at Summit Racing.


AO-91 open for amateur use!

From AMSAT.ORG website

At 06:50 UTC on November 23, 2017, AMSAT Engineering officially commissioned AO-91 (RadFxSat/Fox-1B). AMSAT Vice-President Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, turned over operation to AMSAT Operations in a QSO on the AO-91 transponder with Mark Hammond, N8MH, of the AMSAT Operations team during the pass over the Eastern United States.

N8MH responded and declared AO-91 open for amateur use!

AO-91 was built as a partnership with Vanderbilt University ISDE and hosts four payloads for the study of radiation effects on commercial off the shelf components. The satellite was launched on November 18, 2017 as part of the ELaNa XIV mission, secondary payloads aboard the Delta II rocket that carried the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS-1) satellite to orbit. AO-91 also features the Fox-1 style FM U/v repeater with an uplink on 435.250 MHz (67.0 Hz CTCSS) and a downlink on 145.960 MHz. Satellite and experiment telemetry are downlinked via the “DUV” subaudible telemetry stream and can be decoded with the FoxTelem software.