Zoom Meeting – The Ultimate DX Contact

Seti @ Home-This Wednesday Night Zoom Meeting
This Wednesday Jan 13th @ 7:30PM

On Wednesday Jan 13th the Steel City ARC will be hosting an educational Zoom meeting at 7:30 PM.  We have a very special speaker this week from Seti@Home a member of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence team Dr David Anderson who created software that uses your computer screen saver to search for signals from other  worlds.  Below you will find a better description on how the screen saver works and a link to their site so you can try it out.   If you or your club is interested in joining the Zoom meeting send an email to me and I will add you to the meeting link.  N3LRG (at) W3KWH {dit} COM


The UC Berkeley SETI team has discovered that there are already thousands of computers that might be available for use. Most of these computers sit around most of the time with toasters flying across their screens accomplishing absolutely nothing and wasting electricity to boot. This is where SETI@home (and you!) come into the picture. The SETI@home project hopes to convince you to allow us to borrow your computer when you aren’t using it and to help us “…search out new life and new civilizations.” We’ll do this with a screen saver that can go get a chunk of data from us over the internet, analyze that data, and then report the results back to us. When you need your computer back, our screen saver instantly gets out of the way and only continues it’s analysis when you are finished with your work.

For more information & software: https://setiathome.berkeley.edu/

Dr. David P. Anderson,
Scientist and software architect

David is a computer scientist, with research interests in volunteer computing, distributed systems, and real-time systems. He co-founded SETI@home and directed it from 1998 to 2015. He leads the BOINC project, and is leading Nebula, the back-end data analysis phase of SETI@home.  David is a rock climber, mountain climber, classical pianist,

 

Wash Club 21st – 2 Meter Contest

This January will mark the Twenty-First Annual WASH 2 Meter Contest. We’re looking forward to a chance to stretch our legs, our wheels, and our antennas once again!

Date & Times:
Saturday, January 9th , 2021 from 7 to 11 PM
EST. (That’s January 10th 0000-0400 UTC to the purists!)

Objectives:
• To make as many contacts as possible
• To have fun!

Band, Mode & Frequencies:
The contest will take place solely on 2 meter band.

FM : FM simplex only, no repeater contacts. The FM
frequencies are all standard 2 Meter simplex frequencies, as
per the ARRL 2 Meter Band Plan, every 15 kHz, from
146.505 to 146.595 MHz , and 147.450 to 147.580 MHz.
Use of simplex frequencies in the “FM Experimental
Simplex” band of 145.510 to 145.670 are not recommended.
See list of recommended simplex channels at the end of the
rules.

• CW: 144.05 to 144.1 MHz Only. (See ARRL 2 Meter band
plan)

SSB & AM: 144.2 to 144.275 MHz Only. (See ARRL 2
Meter band plan).

Digital (including RTTY): 144.51 to 144.55 MHz. (See
ARRL 2 Meter band plan) Multiple digital modes may be
used, and participants are free to use any generally
accepted Digital mode, but only ONE Digital QSO with a
given station regardless of mode

Full rules and paperwork:
http://n3sh.org/WASHRAG/2021/2021_WASH_2M_Contest.pdf

 

Digital Net Tonight on UHF Repeater

Reminder there is an digital net tonight at 8:00 PM on the Steel City UHF repeater 444.450 Mhz. Due to the Keystone room being down the digital net will be held on the Steel City Room # 43352.   This is a state wide net and we welcome all C4FM repeater owners and user nodes to connection to the Steel City room to join the net.

See you at 8:00 PM @ Steel City Room #43352

Learn Morse Code with VBand

This project was created by two friends who wanted to (re)learn CW, but didn’t regularly have great propagation between them to practice, and were a bit embarrassed to get on the air at their current skill level. While it allows code to be sent with a keyboard as either a paddle or straight key, it really shines using the USB paddle interface below.

The goal was to make a fun way to practice sending and receiving CW with a buddy, without worrying about a radio, an antenna, a license, good propagation, or RF noise.

Try it out: https://hamradio.solutions/vband/

The USB paddle interface allows sending with an actual paddle or straight key instead of the computer keyboard. The adapter connects to a computer with a USB cable, and has a 3.5mm TRS jack for the paddle / straight key connection.

Paddle Or Straight Key USB Adapter

Testing out the Drake TR-4C @ W3KWH

Trying out Drake TR-4C that was recently recondition by Brian K9VKY and is on loan from its owner Bob Gamble who father was an Ham Radio Operator. It working out nicely on CW we would need to get a mic for phone.  The radio came with an matching remote VFO.

Nearly 2000-mile record-setting contact on 433Mhz

Propagation is a fun thing — especially when you’re talking thousands of miles on UHF! On October 16, 2020 a 1,950 mile contact was made on 433Mhz FM between the Island of St. Helena (U.K.) and Plumstead, South Africa.

The two stations involved in the contact were Garry, ZD7GWM and Tom, ZS1TA in South Africa.

The power used for the contact was a mere 35 watts using a vertical antenna.

How a UHF contact like this possible

So how was this possible? Looking at predicted tropospheric conditions from October 16, 2020 — a marine duct is likely what allowed the two stations to log the contact.

Courtesy of F5LEN/EI7GL

Marine Tropo (MT) occurs when warm dry air overrides a cooler body of water. Marine inversions often extend the entire breadth of lakes and can extend for thousands of miles over the ocean, like in this case. It also spreads into coastal areas by way of sea or lake breezes.

Marine Tropo can become enhanced or combined with other types such as High-Pressure Tropo which can lead to even stronger signals over farther distances.

Tropospheric ducting is not unheard of between St. Helena and South Africa. However, it’s usually on VHF. During the past few years Garry has made numerous contacts on VHF with South African ham radio operators.

The incredible distance for this 70cm contact may be hard to conceptualize. It would be equivalent to a station in New York City having a QSO with someone in Salt Lake City. It doesn’t break the reported 70cm tropospheric record of 2,493 miles — but it ranks right up there!

Come on Bobbie you can break this….

New Drake Exhibit at the VoA Museum

FROM: Ham Talk Live

Jay Adrick, K8CJY and Lee Hite, K8CLI from the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting are here to talk about the new, revamped Drake Radio Exhibit now on display at the museum. We’ll take a look at the history of the Drake company, some interesting facts about the Drake line, and why this exhibit is a must-see for any Drake fan.

{Drake segment starts at timeframe 6:17}

Raspberry Pi * Ham Radio

Since 2012, the Raspberry Pi nano computer has become an increasingly important part of the DIY and « maker » community. The increase in power of the Raspberry Pi over the years offers very interesting possibilities for radio amateurs. Indeed, it allows not to permanently monopolize a PC in the decoding of frames with software like WSJT-X, FLDIGI, etc…, without forgetting the possibility to control the Raspberry Pi remotely and thus to be able to work outside the radio shack as I can sometimes do on my couch. Moreover, this nano computer is now widely used in any Hotspot (DMR or D-STAR).

So why in a club, so few OM use this tool?

I have often asked myself this question and I think it comes from the use of the operating system (OS). When you power on a Raspberry PI, the OS, called Raspbian is stored on a microSD card. This is a Linux distribution specially designed for the Raspberry.

When you want to install a software under Linux, you no longer have to double-click on a downloaded file like « setup.exe » like under Windows. Indeed, you often have to use the console and thus type « command lines » to install or configure a program. This can seem off-putting and frankly very tedious. We are so used to using a graphical environment that we feel like we are back to the early 80’s micro-computing.

Continue Reading:
https://hamprojects.wordpress.com/2020/09/06/raspberry-pi-for-ham-radio/

 

 

Signup – KDKA Special Event Station

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – OCTOBER 12, 2020

Sunday Nov 8th  from 10 am to 5 pm  –  We Will Be “K3D”
Please consider working this special event station and support the SCARC club. So let Bob know if you want to work an hour or two and when on Nov 8th
.

RSVP to Bob NU3Q  —>  nu3q {at} nu3q {dit} us

Our remote operating location – Click on Address for Google directions
Note on Sunday Nov 8th you do not need to feed the parking meters
You will most like bring a folding chair if you want to hang out.

Click Here For Directions To Site

102 West Pike Street
Cannonsburg, PA, 15317

Read The Latest Press Release Here

Thanks to John Rakoczky KA3SZO, a member of the Steel City club, for letting us use his commercial retail space in downtown Canonsburg to operate the KDKA special event station. He informed me the “COVID safe capacity” of his large retail space is fifty (50). In keeping with Governor Wolf’s 20% mandate, I recommend we keep it to no more than ten (10) people at his QTH and that we socially distance appropriately and use masks as conditions warrant.

The location of his building is 102 West Pike Street – Canonsburg 15317. It is located across the street from the Frank Sarris Public Library. There is limited parking in the lot across the street, otherwise you will have to park on the street. He has a bathroom in the rear of the space. I loaned John my 40 meter and 80 meter dipoles and my two 100 foot coax jumpers. He will mount the 40 meter dipole on the roof of his building and stretch the 80 meter dipole inside the attic. His building is 3 stories high and I have used my 40 meter dipole on his roof successfully before. John will get the PR out for us as well.

Please join the KDKA 100 groups.io mail list to stake your place on the calendar. Please note the calendar is filling up fast and keep in mind there are four (4) special event call signs available for use on any given day.