THE $50 HAM: GETTING YOUR TICKET PUNCHED

From: https://hackaday.com WEBSITE

Today we start a new series dedicated to amateur radio for cheapskates. Ham radio has a reputation as a “rich old guy” hobby, a reputation that it probably deserves to some degree. Pick up a glossy catalog from DX Engineering or cruise their website, and you’ll see that getting into the latest and greatest gear is not an exercise for the financially challenged. And thus the image persists of the recent retiree, long past the expense and time required to raise a family and suddenly with time on his hands, gleefully adding just one more piece of expensive gear to an already well-appointed ham shack to “chew the rag” with his “OMs”.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE:
https://hackaday.com/2019/03/08/the-50-ham-getting-your-ticket-punched/

WASHfest 2019

WASHfest 2019
The South Hills Hamfest
Now in our TWENTY FOURTH big year!
Sponsored by the WIRELESS ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH HILLS AMATEUR RADIO CLUB, INC

 

Sunday, February 24th, 2019
8:00 AM until 3:00 PM Rain or Shine (or Snow!)
Home Economics Building, South Park
3735 Buffalo Drive, South Park Township, PA 15129
Behind the Allegheny County Police Station on Brownsville Road
Talk-In on 146.955(-) and 443.650(+) 131.8 PL

For more information: http://www.n3sh.org/Hamfests/2019/WASHFest%202019%20Flyer%201.pdf

2019 Winter Field Day Final Results

Here is our final results from the 2019 Winter Field Day Contest! A huge thank you to everyone who came out to help with the success of our participation, along with a special thank you to Chris – K3PQ for heading up this years contest on behalf of the club!

Total Contacts by Operator:

Operator          Total 
——–                  —– 
K3PQ……………90 
WA3PYU……….65 
KC3MRA……….30 
KB3PJW……….17 
N3LRG…………08 
KC3LYS……….06 
K0LIN………….05 

Building the Dummy Load

By Ken, K4EAA

This is a take-off on a Dummy load that I’ve built in many different forms over the years.   It uses a number of non-inductive resistors in parallel to achieve 50 Ohms over a wide frequency range.  It is submerged in oil to allow somewhat extended operation during tuning or repair procedures.   The advantages are:  (1) It’s cheap,  (2) It provides a very pure 50 Ohm resistive load through 30MHz and beyond,  (3) You can easily add power measurement and rig testing capability.

This one is conservatively designed for rigs that have power output levels up to 130W, such as the Kenwood hybrid lineup.  I built it into a one-quart paint can, readily available at Ace Hardware for about 89 cents.  I’ve used it for about a year now.  A few hundred of your service rigs that you have sent to me have been loaded up into this dummy, and it is still like the day it was built.   I know, because I had to take it apart to take these photos!   It still measures 49.9 Ohms, even after all those rigs, all that power!

Read about the full project on his website:

Hamshack Hotline – Now on Line

Steel City ARC  is now online with Hamshack Hotline
Feel Free to give the club a call:

Call 4547 for the Club House
Call 4591 for the Repeater Hut

Join Us On the Conference Bridge:

Western PA Area conference bridge at 337 with no pin needed
Steel City Private Bridge: 339 See membership page for pins


Check out the WESTERN PA Conference Bridge on
Tuesday Nights around 7:30 PM


Karl and myself have each purchase an Cisco Voice Over IP phone from Ebay/Amazon.  We then got them sign up for telephone numbers from the Hamshack Hotline group.  Hamshack Hotline {“HH”} is a private telephone network for Hams by Ham Radio Operators.  You must be an ham radio operator to get assign for an HH telephone number.  There is a strictly non-commercial use clause in the operating rules, so you will never get any telemarketers or political call on this phone service.  The best part of all this is that it is total free.  Yes, you have to buy an telephone but there no monthly cost involved in this phone service.  You can call another ham directly leave a voicemail or even join a conference call with others hams.   HH was created with the thinking of ECOMM use.  It make a great back up device for emergency communications.  It works where ever you have Internet all you need is a cable, fiber, or even over an Internet mesh network.  People that have gotten and Cisco wifi adapters for the phone and have them work over their car Internet hot spots. Other people have been hooking up their repeaters to HH to let them talk on the air.

If you are interested in the Hamshack Hotline reach out to Karl, WA3VXJ or Christine, N3LRG to find where to purchase the refurbished Cisco IP Phone.   We have purchase them from Amazon and Ebay and both have worked and they have cost from $20 to $30. Please make sure you reach out to the sellers to make sure the phones are unlocked.   Since most home internet routers are not “Power over Ethernet” you will need to pick up an AC adapter or an “Power over Ethernet” injector.  The current acceptable phone models are Cisco SPA-303, SPA-504, SPA-525.  You can also get the Cisco IP Adapter SPA-112 which is an adapter that lets you use any current touch tone phone on the HH network.

Give us a call at the Steel City club house on the Hamshack Hotline phone number # 4547

For more information:

Ham Shack Hotline Homepage:
https://hamshackhotline.com/

Here is an video where they are talking about the Hamshack Hotline.

Edmund Fitzgerald – QSL certificate

W3KWH

View Cert – Click Here: http://w3kwh.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/W3KWH.pdf

Dear Amateur Radio Operator,
TNX for being part of the WØJH “Remembering the Edmund Fitzgerald” Split Rock Lighthouse Special Event! Attached is the QSL certificate you requested for our November 2-4, 2018 event.
 
TNX again for your contact with WØJH Special Event Station; we hope you can join us again!
 
73,
Dave Glas (WØOXB)
Special Events Chair & Past President
Stillwater Amateur Radio Association (SARA)
P.S. February 16-18, 2019, we’ll be operating another special event; this time from one of Minnesota’s frozen lakes! Look for SARA’s “Ice Station WØJH” Special Event. Times and frequencies will be posted onQRZ.com (under WØJH), the SARA and ARRL web sites under Special Events and in the Feb. issue of “QST”. 

Spaceflight’s SSO-A…An Amateur Radio Satellite Bonanza

SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base has no fewer than seventeen Amateur Radio satellite payloads.  A list of the known Amateur Radio missions, websites and their downlink frequencies is as  follows. Which is currently scheduled for Dec 2, 2018.


From the SSO-A Website

We’re launching our first fully dedicated rideshare mission, dubbed SSO-A SmallSat Express, later this year aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 out of Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

Not only does it represent the company’s first purchase of an entire Falcon 9 to accommodate the growing number of customers seeking affordable rideshare options to launch their spacecraft into orbit, it’s also an historic launch:

It’s the largest single rideshare mission from a US-based launch vehicle to date.

Spaceflight has contracted with 64 spacecraft from 34 different organizations for the mission to a Sun-Synchronous Low Earth Orbit. It includes 15 microsats and 49 cubesats from both commercial and government entities, of which more than 25 are from international organizations from 17 countries, including United States, Australia, Italy, Netherlands, Finland, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, UK, Germany, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Poland, Canada, Brazil, and India.


CSIM
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=585A
Downlink 437.250 MHz

ESEO
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=82

Downlink on 437.00MHz and a transponder Uplink on 1263.500MHz
have been coordinated. A revised downlink frequency of 145.895 MHz has been coordinated for FM voice and 1k2/4k8 BPSK telemetry. The ESA has released a video of the satellite’s development:
https://tinyurl.com/ESA-Student-Orbiter

Exseed
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=636

Downlink 145.900 MHz for FM repeater 67 Hz and digipeater downlink and for telemetry and 435.340 MHz for repeater and digipeater uplink

Fox 1C (Fox 1Cliff)
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=455

Downlink 145.920 MHz for FM voice and  DUV data and Uplinks on 435.300 and 1267.300 MHz

JY1-Sat
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=554

Downlink 145.840 MHz and transponder downlink passband on 145.855-145.875 MHz with an inverting uplink on 435.100 – 435.120 MHz

K2SAT
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=552

Downlink TLM beacon 435.835 MHz, FM Repeater 436.225 MHz Data 2404.000 MHz. FM Repeater Uplink 145.980 MHz

KNACKSAT
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=520

Downlink 435.635 MHz

IRVINE02
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=557

Downlink 437.450 MHz

ITASAT
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=435

Downlink 145.860 MHz and 2400.150 MHz

MinXSS-2
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=477

Downlink 437.250 MHz

MOVE-2
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=487

To avoid a frequency clash with another mission, a revised downlink
frequency of 145.950 MHz has been coordinated for 9k6 BPSK

PW-Sat-2
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=545

Downlink 435.275 MHz

RANGE A & B
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=497

Downlink 437.150 MHz (A) and 437.475 MHz (B)

SNUGLITE
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=529

Downlink 437.275 MHz has been coordinated

SNUSAT-2
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=509

Downlink 437.625 MHz and 2402 MHz

SUOMI-100
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=507

Downlink 437.775 MHz and 2410 MHz

Visioncube
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=607

Downlink 437.425 MHz

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information.]

ATV – Fast-Scan Amateur Television

ATV base station block diagram

From the ARRL website….

Introduction

Amateur Television is a great way to combine ham radio with other hobbies, such as RC model airplanes and model rocketry.  Amateur Radio can be used to send video from a remote camera back to the operator over long distances, provided the path is line of sight. For information on other ways to work with images over radio, check the Image Modes page.

Articles

 Amateur Television from Model Planes and Rockets 
Joe Bottiglieri, AA1GW, QST Sept. 2000, pp. 41-44

 An Introduction to Amateur Television – Part 1
QST April 1993, pp. 19-23

 An Introduction to Amateur Television – Part 2 
QST May 1993, pp. 43-47
The basic ATV Station

An Introduction to Amateur Television – Part 3
QST June 1993, pp. 35-41

DVB-T A Solution for ARES Television Operations
QST June 2015 pp. 42-44