Route 66 On The Air

The annual Route 66 On the Air Special Event will take place September 10 – 18, 2022. The purpose of the event is to commemorate the history of the “Mother Road” connecting the east and west United States.

Now in its 23rd year, the Northern Arizona DX Association (NADXA) started the event, which is now coordinated by the Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) in San Bernardino, California.

There will be 21 stations with 1×1 call signs on the air from Chicago, Illinois, to Santa Monica, California, all with consecutive calls starting with W6. NADXA will operate three of the 21 stations, including W6G (Flagstaff, Arizona), and W6S (Arizona Rover 1). They’ll set up at various spots along Route 66 east of Flagstaff, and W6T (Arizona Rover 2) will be set up in Bellemont. Later in the week, the event will be moved to Parks, on old Route 66, west of Flagstaff.

The history of the Mother Road began in 1926, when US Highway 66 was established. It was the first major improvement to the link between the west coast and the nation’s heartland. Through stories, songs, and TV shows, the highway came to symbolize the freedom of the open road, inspiring many to see America in its entirety. The demise of Route 66 began in the 1950s, as construction began on the new interstate highway system. US Route 66 was officially decommissioned in 1986, but today, small portions of the highway still exist in several states.

For more information on participating stations, certificates and decals, and the Route 66 On the Air Special Event, visit the Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) and Northern Arizona DX Association (NADXA) websites.

Germany bring back Novice Class License

Germany is bring back the Novice Class License but with a twist. They are introducing an entry-level amateur radio license, it will be limited to just 10w EIRP in the 144 and 430 MHz bands and will be allowed to build their own equipment.
“N” = Novice New!
“E” = approximate U.S. Tech class
“A” = approximate U.S. Extra class


A translation of the DARC post reads:

Today [June 7], the Federal Ministry for Digital Affairs and Transport presented the draft of a new amateur radio regulation that will bring some innovations for all radio amateurs.

The chairman of the DARC e. V. and the Round Table Amateur Radio (RTA), Christian Entsfellner, DL3MBG was pleased: “The new regulation implements long-standing requirements of the DARC and the Round Table Amateur Radio. Remote operation will finally be allowed in the future. The Ministry has also implemented our demand for a beginner class, which has existed since 2008.

This makes it much easier to get started with amateur radio.” While the existing classes E and A are raised in level due to the introduction of new topics from digital technology, class N focuses on operational knowledge, regulations and basic knowledge of the technology.

Holders of the new Class N will be allowed to transmit on 2m and 70cm with a maximum power of 10W EIRP. “The new entry-level class should offer access to amateur radio in particular to young people and older people in accordance with international requirements,” explains board member Ronny Jerke, DG2RON. The legally stipulated self-build right is not restricted, so even beginners can develop, set up and put into operation radio devices or hotspots themselves.

The exam will follow a cumulative system. First of all, the exam for class N is taken, which already contains all questions from the areas of operational knowledge and regulations. The technical test for class E and then for class A can then be taken.

“The examination catalogs developed by the DARC for the three classes are structured in such a way that the content and questions are not repeated. Content that has already been examined in a lower class no longer plays a role in the examination for a higher class. So all future radio amateurs go through the exams of class N, through E to class A. It should be possible to take all the exams in one day.

Good Reads

“Solder Smoke” is the story of a secret, after-hours life in electronics. Bill Meara started out as a normal kid, from a normal American town. But around the age of 12 he got interested in electronics, and he has never been the same. To make matters worse, when he got older he became a diplomat. His work has taken him to Panama, Honduras, El Salvador, the Spanish Basque Country, the Dominican Republic, the Azores islands of Portugal, London, and, most recently, Rome. In almost all of these places his addiction to electronics caused him to seek out like-minded radio fiends, to stay up late into the night working on strange projects, and to build embarrassingly large antennas above innocent foreign neighborhoods.

Check it out on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/SolderSmoke-Global-Adventures-Wireless-Electronics/dp/0578053128