Steel City College Scholarship Program

The Steel City Amateur Radio Club is please to join with the ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program to be offering our club college scholarship program for 2023 academic year.  The SCARC has set up an $1000 scholarship to any license radio operator going into a Science, Technology, Engineering or Math field of study at any institution. Our only requirements is the winner must hold a current amateur license and has a home address within the ARRL Western Pennsylvania Section. Application for the 2023 academic year have now open on October 1st, 2022.  Please click on the link below to find out more requirement and to submit your application to the ARRL Foundation.

Link: http://www.arrl.org/scholarship-application

Good Crowd For Set Test

Steel City had a good turn out for the Fall 2022 SET TEST at the club house.   We all learn how to handle some National Traffic across both HF bands and VHF bands. I want to thank everyone that showed up for todays event.  Tom KB3NIX, Art WA3BKD,  Walt KA3YNO, Sue KA3JKS, John KA3SZO, K3YY Paul, Bill  KC3THE , Michael N3TDV, Karl, WA3VXJ, Kathy KA3VXM {Who brought all the goodies}

And my Public Service Chairperson: Mike WA3PYU

PA QSO Party Oct 8 & 9th

Steel City ARC will be doing the PA QSO Party once again on Oct 8th & 9th.  We will work all 67 counties of Pennsylvania during this weekend.   We are going to need CW & SSB operators during the event.  On Saturday the event runs from Noon though Midnight and then on Sunday 9 AM – 6PM. And as always food and drinks will be provided for all the operators.

Something to think about:  Since we are working on a second call sign for the club does the club want to support a 2nd small group of operators that will work an in state DX Expedition to one of the rare counties?

 

Jamboree-on-the-Air

Steel City ARC will be hosting scout from around the area on Saturday Oct 15 from 12:00 Noon to 3:00 PM.  If you know of a scout troop that wants to participate please let our Education Chairperson Jeff, N3EVN know at n3evn {at} arrl {dit} net


JOTA: October 14-16, 2022
Jamboree-on-the-Air, or JOTA, is the largest Scouting event in the world. It is held annually the third full weekend in October. JOTA uses amateur radio to link Scouts and hams around the world, around the nation, and in your own community. This jamboree requires no travel, other than to a nearby amateur radio operator’s ham shack. Many times you can find the hams will come to you by setting up a station at your Scout camporee, at the park down the block, or perhaps at a ham shack already set up at your council’s camp.

Tell Me More
When Scouts want to meet young people from another country, they usually think of attending a World Jamboree. But few people realize that each year more than a million Scouts and Guides “get together” over the airwaves for the annual Jamboree-on-the-Air (JOTA). During the 2014 event, worldwide Scouting participation included 1.1 million Boy Scouts and 200,000 Girl Guides/Gils Scouts, for a total participation of over 1.3 million–the largest Scouting event in the world.

JOTA Rules

Stations should call “CQ Jamboree,” or answer stations doing so. Any authorized frequency may be used. It is recommended that stations use the agreed World Scout Frequencies, listed in the guidelines. To avoid congestion, use close-by frequencies.JOTA is not a contest. The idea is not to contact as many stations as possible during the weekend.

Scout website: https://www.scouting.org/jota/
ARRL website: http://www.arrl.org/jamboree-on-the-air-jota

Fall SET Drill This Weekend Oct 1.

Members,
The fall SET drill will take place at the club house at 8:45 AM on Saturday Oct 1st. {This Weekend} We are in need of 6 operators that are willing to help out with the test.  If your interested please send an email to trustee@w3kwh.com to sign up.

NEW MEMBERS:
Your also invited to come up and watch the drill.  This will be a great learning experience on learning the emergency service of ham radio and how to handle traffic when things go bad in the world. Just send an email to the above address to let us know your coming.

The History of the Car Radio

This article was suggested by homeschooler: Dylan

The History of the Car Radio

Written by Carly Hallman

It’s an almost universal experience: People get in the car and turn on their favorite music. But the first car radio wasn’t sold until Chevrolet offered one as an option in 1922. And at first, radios in cars weren’t a popular feature. In 1930, laws were proposed in Massachusetts and Missouri that would ban automobile radios, and a poll in 1934 found that 56% of people thought car radios were a dangerous distraction. Motorola kept refining the idea, though, and designed a more attractive and better-functioning radio. By 1946, around nine million cars had a radio installed in them. The technology improved over time, and by 1963, more than half of all cars driven in America had a radio in them.

Using Their Heads

head unit is like the motherboard of a car’s audio system. Originally, head units only controlled the radio, but over time, they were used to control everything from 8-tracks to CDs. Today’s head units incorporate touchscreens and smartphone integration. The size of the head unit is dictated by the size and design of the car’s console and the size of the front faceplate of the stereo system. Most head units are a size 1DIN or 2DIN; DIN is an acronym for a German company, Deutsches Institut fur Normung.

American Ingenuity

Lee de Forest invented the vacuum tube, which made radios possible. In 1904, he gave a demonstration of his invention at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, and afterward, he was nicknamed the “Father of Radio.” It wasn’t until 1922 when Chevrolet put a Westinghouse radio into a car. But the first successful commercial automobile radio is considered by most experts to be the Motorola 5T71, which was released in 1930.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE:
https://www.titlemax.com/articles/the-history-of-the-car-radio/

 

Route 66 On The Air

The annual Route 66 On the Air Special Event will take place September 10 – 18, 2022. The purpose of the event is to commemorate the history of the “Mother Road” connecting the east and west United States.

Now in its 23rd year, the Northern Arizona DX Association (NADXA) started the event, which is now coordinated by the Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) in San Bernardino, California.

There will be 21 stations with 1×1 call signs on the air from Chicago, Illinois, to Santa Monica, California, all with consecutive calls starting with W6. NADXA will operate three of the 21 stations, including W6G (Flagstaff, Arizona), and W6S (Arizona Rover 1). They’ll set up at various spots along Route 66 east of Flagstaff, and W6T (Arizona Rover 2) will be set up in Bellemont. Later in the week, the event will be moved to Parks, on old Route 66, west of Flagstaff.

The history of the Mother Road began in 1926, when US Highway 66 was established. It was the first major improvement to the link between the west coast and the nation’s heartland. Through stories, songs, and TV shows, the highway came to symbolize the freedom of the open road, inspiring many to see America in its entirety. The demise of Route 66 began in the 1950s, as construction began on the new interstate highway system. US Route 66 was officially decommissioned in 1986, but today, small portions of the highway still exist in several states.

For more information on participating stations, certificates and decals, and the Route 66 On the Air Special Event, visit the Citrus Belt Amateur Radio Club (CBARC) and Northern Arizona DX Association (NADXA) websites.

Germany bring back Novice Class License

Germany is bring back the Novice Class License but with a twist. They are introducing an entry-level amateur radio license, it will be limited to just 10w EIRP in the 144 and 430 MHz bands and will be allowed to build their own equipment.
“N” = Novice New!
“E” = approximate U.S. Tech class
“A” = approximate U.S. Extra class


A translation of the DARC post reads:

Today [June 7], the Federal Ministry for Digital Affairs and Transport presented the draft of a new amateur radio regulation that will bring some innovations for all radio amateurs.

The chairman of the DARC e. V. and the Round Table Amateur Radio (RTA), Christian Entsfellner, DL3MBG was pleased: “The new regulation implements long-standing requirements of the DARC and the Round Table Amateur Radio. Remote operation will finally be allowed in the future. The Ministry has also implemented our demand for a beginner class, which has existed since 2008.

This makes it much easier to get started with amateur radio.” While the existing classes E and A are raised in level due to the introduction of new topics from digital technology, class N focuses on operational knowledge, regulations and basic knowledge of the technology.

Holders of the new Class N will be allowed to transmit on 2m and 70cm with a maximum power of 10W EIRP. “The new entry-level class should offer access to amateur radio in particular to young people and older people in accordance with international requirements,” explains board member Ronny Jerke, DG2RON. The legally stipulated self-build right is not restricted, so even beginners can develop, set up and put into operation radio devices or hotspots themselves.

The exam will follow a cumulative system. First of all, the exam for class N is taken, which already contains all questions from the areas of operational knowledge and regulations. The technical test for class E and then for class A can then be taken.

“The examination catalogs developed by the DARC for the three classes are structured in such a way that the content and questions are not repeated. Content that has already been examined in a lower class no longer plays a role in the examination for a higher class. So all future radio amateurs go through the exams of class N, through E to class A. It should be possible to take all the exams in one day.

Good Reads

“Solder Smoke” is the story of a secret, after-hours life in electronics. Bill Meara started out as a normal kid, from a normal American town. But around the age of 12 he got interested in electronics, and he has never been the same. To make matters worse, when he got older he became a diplomat. His work has taken him to Panama, Honduras, El Salvador, the Spanish Basque Country, the Dominican Republic, the Azores islands of Portugal, London, and, most recently, Rome. In almost all of these places his addiction to electronics caused him to seek out like-minded radio fiends, to stay up late into the night working on strange projects, and to build embarrassingly large antennas above innocent foreign neighborhoods.

Check it out on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/SolderSmoke-Global-Adventures-Wireless-Electronics/dp/0578053128